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7 Pet Birds Perfect For Outdoors

Keeping pet birds outdoors is an option for anyone with limited space indoors. Just as pet birds can be kept and bonded with indoors, keeping them outside will be just the same. The only difference will be how exposed the birds are to weather and sunlight.

You will need an aviary which is essentially a large outdoor cage that allows enough room for birds to fly. This will allow the bird to move and exercise enough. 

However, if the weather drops below 40 degrees fahrenheit, or goes above 90, then you may need to bring your birds inside, or sort out a form of shelter inside their aviary.

But what are the best pet birds for keeping outdoors?


7 pet birds perfect for outdoors

1. Lovebirds

Fischer’s Lovebird

Lovebirds are an easy pet bird for beginners. They are fun-loving and will socialize with their owners once they have bonded.

They are suited to being outdoors because they love bathing and basking in warm sunlight. They are better suited to summer months or warm climates.

As their name suggests, lovebirds like to be paired up. They are prone to loneliness and lethargy if they are neglected. Either interact with your lovebird every day or get them a friend to socialize with.


2. Budgies

budgie escaping

Budgies are among the most common pet birds to keep. We all have one family member or friend who has a budgie.

They are fairly hardy and will enjoy being in an outside enclosure as long as the temperature goes no lower than around 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Budgies are very fast flyers and will enjoy the space provided by an outdoor aviary. They will move from perch to perch all day. Budgies need interaction from humans or from other birds, otherwise, they will get bored and experience distress.


3. Rainbow Lorikeets

Rainbow Lorikeets

These birds are medium-sized parrots that can live up to 30 years. They are brightly colored with green bodies, a blue head, an orange breast, and a yellow ring around their neck.

They are best kept in a pair with no other birds in the enclosure.

They can be aggressive to other birds. This is because in the wild, lorikeets travel around in groups allocated to a certain territory.

The territorial birds may decide that one spot is theirs and attack any visitors. Lorikeets are especially fearless when it comes to fighting over territory.


4.Chinese Painted Quail

Chinese Painted Quail

Although these birds do not fly, they can be kept outside in aviaries. They are officially categorized as poultry because they are a variation of birds traditionally bred for consumption.

They are not normally considered as pets, but can make great additions to an aviary.

Because they are foragers, they will eat crumbs of food that inevitably fall as other birds feed.

They are known as natural hoovers, picking up all those seeds that end up on the floor. They are easygoing with other birds, and will stay to the floor away from them.


5. Finches

gouldian Finch

Finches are very small birds that can be kept in outdoor aviaries. Because of their tiny size, you will need an aviary with a mesh style exterior to stop them squeezing out.

Finches are known for their beautiful vocalizations and their entertaining interaction with other finches. They prefer to be with other finches rather than humans. Although they will tolerate human interaction they do not seek it out like other birds.

Finches may get cold in the winter so you will need to ensure there is a covered are of the aviary.

The interior section of the aviary may even need heating in order to keep the finches warm. You can buy purpose made aviary heaters that have no exposed elements. 


6. Hyacinth Macaws

Hyacinth Macaws

This enormous bird is actually the largest typically kept as a pet. The reach up to a meter in length—that’s about 40 inches!

They are typically kept outside because they are just too big to be indoors. You will need the largest aviary possible to allow the macaw to move around.

They can live as long as 60 years, so make sure you have a plan for where the bird will end up. Making them move often is stressful for a domesticated bird.

You will also need a lot of food for these huge birds as they will be far more hungry than a smaller one. 

Typically reserved for professional bird keepers, the hyacinth macaw is no easy bird to look after.

If you have roughly $10,000 to spare you can get one yourself. Remember to factor in the enormous aviary and all the other tools for keeping it healthy.


7. Pigeons

pigeon

Pigeons are not typically considered a pet bird but rather a racing one. People who practice pigeon racing will breed and seek out the best pigeons for racing abilities.

Racing pigeons are established in a nest then taken to a far away location before being let loose. The race is to see which pigeon arrives back at the nest first. Top-end racing pigeons can race as far as 1,100 miles.

As well as their reputation for racing, pigeons are actually a docile and rewarding bird to keep as a pet.

Unsurprisingly, they are very hardy and can survive in temperatures below freezing, as long as they have a place to hide away and stay warm.

Pigeons can be kept outdoors and will congregate around a nest perched high up on a ledge. They will always want to pair up with a member of the opposite gender. Pigeons mate for life and will pine for interaction with other pigeons. 

Did you know that a racing pigeon recently sold for £1.2 million dollars? Read more here!


Final Thoughts

Keeping birds outside in an aviary will require you to monitor weather and temperature as well as the usual things birds need to be healthy.

Some birds need the added space of an aviary and cannot be kept indoors healthily.  Before setting out to get some birds outdoors, make sure you have the right space and equipment.

Getting a bird in any case is a big undertaking as it can be with you for up to 50 or 60 years

Hutch and Cage.com does not provide veterinary advice. Our aim is to provide the reader with information to enable them to make a good decision when making a purchase or caring for their pet. All content is therefore for informational purposes only. If you're concerned about the health of your pet you should seek medical advice from a vet.